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Frontpage News 2013 Raising social awareness in Hungary

CVE-20120614-Hungary-1039
Photo: Christophe Vander Eecken

Raising social awareness in Hungary

Young people from Hungary can now apply for funding for study trips to Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway under the Hungarian NGO fund.  

The Hungarian NGO sector has been hard hit by the economic crisis and struggles to develop their capacity and to enhance their advocacy role.  At the same time, social concerns, such as unemployment and social exclusion, remain high on the agenda. To counter these challenges, the EEA Grants have set aside almost €13.5 million under the NGO fund to strengthen civil society in Hungary.

A call for proposal is now open under this programme. The call supports study trips for a minimum of two weeks for young people (aged 18-30) to explore good practices that could be used to raise social awareness and to tackle different social problems in Hungary.

The maximum amount of funding per person is €3000.

Who can apply for funding?

Young people from Hungary (aged 18-30) who are active in the Hungarian civil sector and civil life can apply for funding. Additionally, the applicant must:

  • Be able to communicate in English and/or the language of one of the donor countries – Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway – and be able to prepare reports and interviews;
  • Use modern communication tools professionally for their reports (blog, video sharing, Instagram, Facebook, twitter, etc.)
  • Be able to organise their trip by themselves, and;
  • Be able to present their experience to the media and other groups.

More detailed information about the conditions and requirements can be found in the call text (see link below)

When is the application deadline?

The application deadline is 31 January, 2014.

Click here for more information on the conditions and eligibility requirements for this call

Click here for more information on the Hungarian NGO fund

Click here for more information on programmes and projects in Hungary funded by the EEA and Norway Grants